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Welcome to 1st Marown Scout Group

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About

Marown LogoAbout 1st Marown Scouts

Adventure is at the heart of everything we do. It is the single most important thing that sets Scouts apart.

It’s exciting being involved with us. We believe that through the everyday adventure of Scouting, young people and adult volunteers regularly experience new challenges that enrich their lives.

We offer hundreds of activities, as diverse as kayaking, abseiling, staged performance, Axe Throwing, and archery. There’s something for every young person, whatever their physical ability.

How our programme works

Every young person in Scouting enjoys a balanced programme of activities, events and experiences, based around subject areas we call Programme Zones.

The zones vary slightly depending on which of our sections the young person is in, but they cover a huge range of activities, from outdoor and physical pursuits to community involvement, creative expression and learning about the wider world.

Together we help Scouts get the most out of their Scouting experience by including elements from as many zones as possible within the activities on offer. And, the older they get, the more input young people themselves have in their own programme.

Hiking in the dark. Travelling across Poland with just a backpack and three friends. Spending the first night away from home.

Activities are an integral part of Scouting. But as well as being challenging physically, our activities help young people set and achieve goals and grow in confidence.

Beavers

Beavers age 6-8 are the beginning of the Scout journey

Beaver Scouts are our youngest members. They usually meet weekly to take part in a wide range of activities including games, crafts, singing, visits and good turns, along with plenty of outdoor activities. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the fun and excitement of camps and sleepovers.

The Beaver Promise:
I promise to do my best,
To be kind and helpful,
and to love God.

Beaver Scouts are also taught about the basic aspects of Scouting, though much of this is left for older sections.

Beavers
Badge placement diagram for Beavers

Cubs

Cubs age 8-10 1/2 are the second step up the Scout ladder

When a child joins Cubs they are known as a ‘Recruit’ until they get invested.

Before getting invested, the recruit needs to learn the essentials of Cub Scouting;

The Cub Scout Law:

1st Marown Cub Scout Law

Cub Scout Promise:

1st Marown Cub Scout Promise

A Cub Scout Does A Good Turn Every Day Cub Scout Good Turn Diary [PDF]

Scout Motto:

‘Be Prepared’

The ‘The Grand Howl‘: [Download PDF]

Our Pack has a copy of the Jungle Book DVD which you can borrow so you can learn the Jungle Story and understand the meaning of the names used in the pack. Do you know who ‘Akela’ is?

If you haven’t already been given one, you will need to complete and sign one of our information forms, which can be downloaded here:

Membership Information Form [Download PDF]

When a Cub gets invested into the Pack, parents will be invited to join us for the cermony. Parents are welcome to bring their cameras so they can capture this special occasion.

This will be a good opportunity to meet the leaders, ask questions, and find out more about the Pack and our plans for the future weeks.

To help you understand better we have prepared Cub membership booklet [PDF]

Scouts

About 5th Douglas ScoutsScouting is for boys and girls aged between 10½ and 14 years, who want to make friends and develop their widening interests in ways that are both educational and fun. It is ideal for young people who want a break from the usual after school routine of homework, games and TV. With the emphasis on adventurous activities, action and involvement, Scouting means more than just camping. Hiking, rock climbing, gliding, sailing, pioneering, canoeing, parascending, abseiling, First Aid, motor mechanics, electronics, amateur radio and photography are just some of the things they do. Their uniform of activity trousers, with teal green polo or long sleeved shirt, reflects their adventurous lifestyle. Each Scout Troop consists of small groups (usually called Patrols) of six to eight young people, one of whom is the Patrol Leader. The PL’s share responsibility with the adult Leader for maintaining standards and training within the Troop. All Scouts are encouraged to take part in the decision-making process and regular Forums provide the chance for them to help in planning Troop activities.

Outdoor activities feature prominently in the Scout Troop. The highlight for most is the annual summer camp or expedition, and much of the rest of the year is devoted to preparing for this. Even in winter there may be Patrol hikes or weekend camps. Map reading, camp cooking, First Aid and other skills can be practised at any time of the year.

Scout Promise
On my honour, I promise that I will do my best to do my duty to God and the Queen, to help other people and to keep the Scout Law.

Scout Law
A Scout is to be trusted.
A Scout is loyal.
A Scout is friendly and considerate.
A Scout belongs to the world-wide family of Scouts.
A Scout has courage under all difficulties.
A Scout makes good use of time and is careful of possessions and property.
A Scout has self-respect and respect for others.

Basic Scout Skills
Here are a few videos which will help you acquire some basic Scouting skills..
Pitching your tent

Firelighting

Light a Fire using only the Sun!

Camping Tips

Whipping a rope


Scouts
Badge placement diagram for Scouts